'Color temperature' is a way to describing the color warmth/coolness of light.  You may have seen this when buying light bulbs for your house, it is shown as a number 3600K or 5500K, etc.

The higher the number the 'cooler' or bluer the light becomes, while lower numbers mean the light is more orange.

This can be important if you are doing photography/video as the color temperature will affect the colors in your photographs/video.  In this case, ideally, you should try to use a neutral color, as close to 5500K as possible.

“Lux” is the standard unit of measure for illumination (i.e. brightness) of a surface at a given point. 

This means the Lux value is only a point brightness NOT the overall output, but it is useful as a comparison between different beam patterns.
One Lux is equal to one lumen per square meter.  Therefore, you can see that from the two examples, Lux measurements need to be considered along with other information.

1000 Lumens concentrated into an area of 1-meter square, would equal 1000 Lux

BUT

1000 Lumens spread over 10 square meters, equals only 100 Lux

Example Lux values:
•    Full moonlight = ~1 Lux
•    Dark overcast day = 100 Lux
•    Office lighting = 300~500 Lux
•    Direct sunlight = 32000~130000 Lux

Burn time is the definition of how long in minutes or hours the torch will produce a useful amount of light. 

This is often measured in different ways by different manufacturers; refer to the NEMA FL-1 standards We measure our burn time, based on the time it takes to go from 100% to 50% brightness as we consider this the point where the drop in brightness is noticeable; and the battery should be replaced.

“Beam Angle” is the angle of the light produced by the torch, this is measured at 50% of maximum power;

this is also considered as ‘half angle’ as it is only the angle of one side of the graph (see below).  Hence, to get the actual angle of the beam, you need to double it!

Lumen is the standard unit of measure for the total amount of light from a source, in all directions. 

This tells you how much light the torch produces, with no regard for the area, unlike Lux.  This is demonstrated by the example below:

1000 Lumens concentrated into an area of 1-meter square, would equal 1000 Lux 

BUT

1000 Lumens spread over 10 square meters, equals only 100 Lux